News

Looking for some reading matter over Xmas/NY?

Before I get on to some suggestions of non-Australian fantasy writers below, here's the cover of my next book, which will be published mid-April, worldwide. 
This is the final book in The Forsaken Lands trilogy.

While you are waiting for it  ...
Here are some writers with new books to try 
(I will talk about some Australian writers in another post):

Ian Tregellis:
 

War looms over New France and the Brasswork Throne in THE RISING, Ian's newest novel, which is book 2 in the Alchemy Wars trilogy. 
See more here: http://iantregillis.com/

Kate Elliott: 

Kate has a new book out. Yay! She is one of my favourite authors.
BLACK WOLVES is the first book in a new epic fantasy series. 

Carol Berg:

The second and final of her Sanctuary novels is out. ASH AND SILVER -- War Magic: A secret military Order that can erase memory. What could go wrong? See more here: http://www.sff.net/people/carolberg/
 
Alex Dellamonica:

A DAUGHTER OF NO NATION, second novel in the Stormwrack fantasy series is out.

Steven Harper:

BLOOD STORM, a new fantasy novel from Roc. The power of the shape returns, but will it bring peace or war? 
See more here: http://stevenpizikscom.netfirms.com/?page_id=16

Juliet E. McKenna:


Juliet has been putting her backlist up on Wizard's Tower Press. Take a look!
Juliet's webpage:  http://www.julietemckenna.com/?p=1827
Wizard Tower: http://wizardstowerpress.com/
 


On reading one’s own reviews…

I really don't get this whole thing about not reading reviews of one's own books. To me, that's like writing into a vacuum. 

Most of us novel authors write because we love to create a story* -- few would do it, then never ever let anyone read those stories.

Yes, we sometimes get scathing reviews. You can't please everyone. But you also might get called "This decade's best fantasy writer" as one recent Amazon reviewer said about me. I don't actually believe that, mind you, but boy, does that boost the ego, and inspire me to write!

*Few do it  for the money -- most of us don't make sufficient income from books to live on!

NEWS…

TWO THINGS:

The Fall of the Dagger, the third and last book of The Forsaken Lands trilogy, now has a set publication date: 19th April 2016 (USA) and 21st April 2016 (UK). 

And the MIRAGE MAKERS trilogy is now available in ebook form in the USA, all three books. Start with the first: THE HEART OF THE MIRAGE.

Where Do You Get Your Ideas From?

Over the past two weeks I have been asked by three different people:
                                  Where do you get your ideas from?"
If you are not a novelist, you probably have no idea how common that question is!

Answers vary from the tongue in the cheek ("At this quaint little curiosity shop in the lane behind the markets..."), to the more mundane ("From inside my head"). Only one of those is near true.

Even more truthfully, I can illustrate the answer to the question by the photo above, taken this week while with a group of naturalists from the West Australian Naturalists Club exploring the Mount Lesuer National Park near Jurien Bay, some 270 km north of Perth. If you look very carefully, you will get an idea of scale -- there is someone actually standing at the middle of the foot of that dark...thing.

Most people, coming across something like that, would look at it -- and after dismissing the possibility of an elephant rampaging around in the West Australia woodlands -- would decide that it is actually some kind of dead plant. In fact, a closer look would reveal a dead tree covered with a tangle of dodder, a kind of creeper (Cuscuda sp).


 But to  a writer?
Our brains work differently. We look at something ordinary, and think something extraordinary. In effect, we ask ourselves, "What if...?"

In this case:
"What if that was really an alien life form?" (A science fiction writer)
"What if there was a skeleton hidden in there?" (A crime writer)
"What if that dodder was a magic twine keeping an evil sorcerer imprisoned in its coils?" (A fantasy writer)
"What if that plant was about to take over the earth?" (A horror writer)
"What if it was the disguised entrance to an underground laboratory?" (A thriller writer.)

So the truth is that writers see exactly landscape as non-writers, but our brains use the mundane as the spring board for our imaginations. And that is where we get our ideas.


SWANCON-NATCON 2015, AWARDS and…

Well, what a lovely day yesterday was.

SWANCON, the SF convention of Western Australia, was this year also the Australian National SF convention, which for a start is always fun. This year the International Guest was author and blogger John Scalzi ( an inspired choice!) and the National Guest was Kylie Chan (equally fabulous!). And I was sharing a hotel room with Donna M. Hanson, Canberra writer, con-organiser and longtime friend. So all those things = have a great time.

Lots of old friends, uncovered new ones. 
Yesterday I had a kaffeeklatsch with some of the attendees, which gave me an excuse to babble (and thanks for all who came to listen). In the evening, there were the awards, which included the Tin Ducks (for West Australian talent), the Ditmars (the national awards) and the A.Bertram Chandler Award for Contributions to Australian SF.

So what  could  be better than for me to win two awards and for Donna to win the Bertram Chandler (richly deserved, I might say, as there is no one who has worked harder than Donna in the interests of Australian SF). The Ditmar was shared in a tie with the lovely Trudi Canavan (who is touring in Europe at the moment). For my book to be up there with Thief's Magic is a huge compliment.

So there I am with not one, but two, especially crafted and totally gorgeous trophies and some very golden memories. The photo below is of Donna holding Trudi's award and me with my Ditmar.

Me looking as supercilious as possible
The presenter was John Scalzi, and that man is SO MEAN. We had been talking earlier on and I'd told him that I'd never won anything and so there was no way he'd be presenting anything to me that night, cos I don't win things.

When he announced the award, and realising that Trudi was not present, he said "And the winner is Thief's Magic by Trudi Canavan!"
That presentation was made and I thought, 'Oh well, no surprise...'
 And that sneaky man then said, fixing me with a beady eye...  "Wait, there's more. It was a tie..."

 And here is me (cynically dubious of the depth of his contrition)  wondering if I should forgive him:


Of course no one wins awards without help. 
My beta readers are fabulous for a start. 
My editor at Orbit (Hachette), Jenni Hill, deserves a mention.
 And then there's all the folk at Swancon and Natcon who worked to organise the awards. And lastly -- and perhaps most importantly -- all those people who voted. 

Very hard to photogroph because they are clear!
You rock, one and all.




THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN US & UK COVER

The one on the left is the UK cover.  The book itself is a smaller size and the cover is slightly bluer and darker. 
 The US book on the left has a tinge more green and is lighter.

The other difference is in the reader/reviewer comments on the back. 

UK has quotes from Elizabeth Moon and Karen Miller; 
US has Karen again (but a different quote), Publishers Weekly and RT Book Reviews.

I have no idea why there is a difference, 
but I suspect there is a reason!


The Kind of Review…

 ...that every author loves.


Every now and then you get a review from someone who really "gets" what you, the writer, are trying to say.
Here is one such, from Ryan Frye at Civilian Reader blog.

Below is Ryan's summary, but you can read the whole review here.

Overall, The Lascar’s Dagger is a great read. The pacing is great, with plenty of action and swagger. While I thoroughly enjoyed every aspect of this book, Larke left plenty of hints that there’s greater depth to the characters, the world and the story to be found in later volumes. If you are looking for a new epic fantasy series that will engage, entertain (and maybe even enthrall you) in equal measures, then Larke’s your author and The Forsaken Lands is your series.

NEWS! NEWS! NEWS!


THE LASCAR'S DAGGER 
has been shortlisted for two Australian awards for 2014.


One is the Aurealis Awards, which is a juried (juryed?) award. 
The book is up for the Best Fantasy Novel 2014.
The winner will be announced in Canberra on April 11th.

The other is the Ditmar Awards, which is a reader/fan-voted award
and it is up for the Best SpecFic Novel 2014.
This will be announced at the Australian National SF Convention over Easter (which is Swancon this year).

This is the eight time I have been shortlisted for the Aurealis, but I think the first time I have had a novel shortlisted for both.

TODAY I HAVE A NEW BOOK OUT WORLDWIDE

The second book of THE FORSAKEN LANDS is out today.

If you haven't read book 1, THE LASCAR'S DAGGER, look here for reviews to see if it might interest you. To my intense pleasure, it made "the best fantasy of the year" for one SFF blogger, and featured on a couple of "best-books-read-in-2014" lists compiled by book bloggers.

So what is Book 2, THE DAGGER'S PATH all about? 

Well, half of it is set on the opposite side of the world, in the spice islands of the story. That's the Sorrel, Saker, Juster and Ardhi thread.

Back in the Va-cherished Hemisphere, those left behind (Fritillary Reedling, Lady Mathilda, Gerelda) have their own horrors to confront. 

Both sides of the known world are under threat, but the threats are very different ... or are they linked? The characters have been pushed by the dagger into confronting these dangers, but how they tackle them, and whether they find solutions -- that's up to them.

 
The world of The Forsaken Lands Trilogy





















Below are some photographs of some of things and places that inspired me. 

Much of the background of the story has its roots in South-east Asia where I have lived and worked  for most of my life
     -- only this time with buccaneers, unscrupulous merchants, battles, mystery, conflict and mayhem. 
A morning in tropical rainforest, Malaysia


Pulau Tiga (the original Survivor island of first show)

Sabah -- glorious tropical Islands
Sabah mountains








As part of the book includes the journey of getting from one side of the world to the other, I had to pay attention to sailing ships. I went on board every one I find, but the two which offered the greatest authenticity and were more appropriate to the period were two replicas found in Australia:  Dufken, below, from 1606 and the Endeavour from 1770.
 Below: officer cabins on Endeavour

Endeavour replica mess
Interior of the Duyfken replica - 1st European ship to Australia
Main crew mess of Endeavour