News

TODAY I HAVE A NEW BOOK OUT WORLDWIDE

The second book of THE FORSAKEN LANDS is out today.

If you haven't read book 1, THE LASCAR'S DAGGER, look here for reviews to see if it might interest you. To my intense pleasure, it made "the best fantasy of the year" for one SFF blogger, and featured on a couple of "best-books-read-in-2014" lists compiled by book bloggers.

So what is Book 2, THE DAGGER'S PATH all about? 

Well, half of it is set on the opposite side of the world, in the spice islands of the story. That's the Sorrel, Saker, Juster and Ardhi thread.

Back in the Va-cherished Hemisphere, those left behind (Fritillary Reedling, Lady Mathilda, Gerelda) have their own horrors to confront. 

Both sides of the known world are under threat, but the threats are very different ... or are they linked? The characters have been pushed by the dagger into confronting these dangers, but how they tackle them, and whether they find solutions -- that's up to them.

 
The world of The Forsaken Lands Trilogy





















Below are some photographs of some of things and places that inspired me. 

Much of the background of the story has its roots in South-east Asia where I have lived and worked  for most of my life
     -- only this time with buccaneers, unscrupulous merchants, battles, mystery, conflict and mayhem. 
A morning in tropical rainforest, Malaysia


Pulau Tiga (the original Survivor island of first show)

Sabah -- glorious tropical Islands
Sabah mountains








As part of the book includes the journey of getting from one side of the world to the other, I had to pay attention to sailing ships. I went on board every one I find, but the two which offered the greatest authenticity and were more appropriate to the period were two replicas found in Australia:  Dufken, below, from 1606 and the Endeavour from 1770.
 Below: officer cabins on Endeavour

Endeavour replica mess
Interior of the Duyfken replica - 1st European ship to Australia
Main crew mess of Endeavour


HOW TO MAKE AN AUTHOR HAPPY

It's actually very easy.

Give book tokens or books as presents.
Buy books. For yourself. As presents for others.

Any books. Books for babies and toddlers, so they'll grow up in a home with books. Books for kids who've just learned to read, to give them the feeling of accomplishment. Books for kids, books for teenagers. Fiction. Non-fiction. Picture books, eBooks, real books, graphic novels, how-to books. Biographies, thrillers, whodunnits, fantasies, science fiction novels, horror stories, cookery books, romances, literary novels.

Why would any of that make authors happy? Because it keeps bookstores going, it keeps the publishers alive, it keeps the industry healthy. And it fosters a new generation of readers, and keeps an older generation of readers happy.

Of course, if you want to make a particular author ecstatic, buy their books. 


If you don't have enough money to buy, then get their books out of the library, read them, blog/tweet/facebook/review them anywhere or everywhere. Tell your friends about them. In fact, we're actually very easy to please!

And remember: Book 2 of THE FORSAKEN LANDS 
will be out mid-January! It's called 
THE DAGGER'S PATH

Tring Tiles: more book research (Middle Ages)

There's a bit of mystery about how these tiles ended up in a curiosity shop in Tring, U.K.
 After all, they date from about 1330!

They portray a series of scenes from -- supposedly -- the life of Jesus, but they aren't just the same old New Testament tales. They are a medieval take on biblical stories and are particularly interesting because they portray the everyday life of the 14th century England rather than the Palestine over a thousand years earlier. They can be seen in the British Museum in London.

The above tile supposedly shows Jesus playing by the river making pools. When a bully destroys one, he falls dead, only to be resurrected by the young Jesus, apparently achieving this miracle by giving him a kick, after being admonished by his mother. (Or touching him lightly with his foot. Take your pick.) The first English comic strip?

INSPIRED BY A SALT CELLAR

 While I was in the U.K. on my recent trip, 
one of the things I did was to visit museums, 
castles, art galleries and stately homes. 

There was a reason beyond just enjoyment: 
background research for my novels. 
Today this photo I took of a salt cellar 
became the inspiration for a section 
in the chapter I am presently writing 
of Book 3 of The Forsaken Lands.

(Yep, you read that right: salt cellar)
Called the Burghley Nef, it was crafted in France 
in the early part of the 16th century. 

It's now in the Victoria & Albert Museum in London. 
Made from a nautilus shell and gilded silver,
 it's more than 40 cm high. 
Yep, rather large for a salt cellar! 

The salt was put in a dish on the deck, 
and the whole thing placed in front of 
an honoured guest... 
 

LISTEN TO ME…

Well, I am back home. Minus luggage for a while, but it did turn up. And I brought home a cold. That was NOT a good exchange, airline people!

I have since been trying to do my taxes and write a book -- those two things don't mix very well, I find. When I'm doing one, I worry about not doing the other...
Anyway, until I get back to posting pretty pictures and such, here's something to listen to:



 Cheryl Morgan is the interviewer, Ujima Radio is based in Bristol, UK. The first person interviewed is also a writer, Amy C. Fitzjohn, speaking about going the self-published route and how to raise profile.

Then me, chatting about my life, writing and such. Enjoy!

FANTASYCON 2014: MY SCHEDULE



 The British Fantasy Convention this year is in York 
(Friday 5th-Sunday 7th September), 
and I will be there -- my first time at this particular convention.


I will be a panellist on two panels (see below)
and also giving a 20 minute reading from either
 The Lascar's Dagger or The Dagger's Path.

And I'd like some help here. 
If you have an opinion on these panel topics, 
email me, or comment here or on facebook or twitter... 

For example:
What fantasy/SF books have you read
(apart from The Isles of Glory!) 
where there was a platonic friendship between women
forming a central part of the book (or fantasy TV series/film)?

Why do you think (if indeed you do) that such platonic friendship 
between women in fantasy fiction is rarer than male ones?

Is it necessary to dispose of the parents of young protagonists? 
Can you think of successful examples where parents were a full participant of the young hero/heroine's adventures?


Saturday 12.00 Noon  
Dead Parents, Burned Homesteads and Wicked Stepmothers
Is it essential to write out the parents before youthful characters can head out on adventures? Are adult figures always unhelpful or malign? Should writers search for ways to keep parents around — or do fantasies of a world without parents fulfil a real need?
Marc Gascoigne (m), Edward Cox, Emma Newman, Sophia McDougall, Glenda Larke, Laura Lam

Saturday 3.00pm 
She Ain’t Heavy, She’s My Sister
Kirk and Spock, Luke and Han, Frodo and Sam – epic friendships between men are common in fantasy, but friendships between women, or platonic relationships between men and women that stay that way – are much thinner on the ground. The panellists discuss why it matters and examine some of the rare exceptions.
Roz Kaveney (m), Mhairi Simpson, Glenda Larke, Charlaine Harris

THE FORSAKEN LANDS: BOOK TWO

Here's the cover!
 
That's Ardhi, by the way...
 

Due out January 2015!
 
THEY FOLLOW WHERE THE DAGGER LEADS

When sailors came to Ardhi’s island home, they plundered not only its riches, but its magic too. Now Ardhi must retrieve what was stolen, but there are ruthless men after this power, men who will do anything to possess it . . .
Sorcerers, lascars, pirates and thieves collide in this thrilling sequel to Glenda Larke’s epic fantasy adventure, THE LASCAR’S DAGGER.

 ‘Outstanding all the way to the last word.’ – Elizabeth Moon on The Lascar’s Dagger